Steve Julian, longtime voice of KPCC’s Morning Edition, dies during 57

Steve Julian, a horde of KPCC’s Morning Edition given 2000, died during his home Sunday morning during a age of 57 from complications from brain cancer.

For 15 years, Julian’s smooth, balmy voice woke adult tens of thousands of listeners in Southern California, providing a day’s news, continue and traffic.

“He was a unaccompanied talent,” pronounced Larry Mantle, horde of KPCC’s AirTalk and Julian’s best friend. “He is totally irreplaceable.

“The tinge and brilliance of his voice,” he added, “perfectly conveyed a male behind it.”

Julian was innate in Pomona in 1958 and spent a infancy of his life in Southern California.

“He came opposite as someone who was knowledgeable, permitted and accessible, and that’s a kind of sound we wanted – one that was not lecturing to we though was roving along with we in a automobile to work,” pronounced Bill Davis, trainer of Southern California Public Radio/KPCC.

A possibility assembly launches a career in news

Julian’s news career began when he met Mantle while operative during KPRO, a Riverside radio station, in a early 1980s. KPRO was in a routine of switching a format from large rope song to all-news and talk. The trainer overheard Julian, who worked in production, articulate to Mantle, who was a partner news director, as they discussed a day’s events in a newsroom.

“The news executive pronounced that we had such good chemistry that we should co-anchor a afternoon expostulate time,” Mantle recalled.

It was a successful, if short-lived, pairing. Mantle shortly left to join KPCC as a news director, and Julian motionless to follow in his father’s footsteps and turn a military officer.

Steve Julian (bottom row, distant left) in 1991, when he was a military officer.

Steve Julian (bottom row, distant left) in 1991, when he was a military officer. Courtesy Felicia Friesema

Julian went behind to school, attending a military academy during Rio Hondo College and assimilated a Baldwin Park Police Department. 

“His dream wasn’t to work in radio, it was to be a cop,” Mantle said. 

But while on a job, Julian celebrated an occurrence where he believed his associate officers were regulating extreme force and reported it. Afterwards, he felt shunned by his colleagues and motionless to leave a force.

In 1995, Julian returned to broadcasting as a trade contributor for AirWatch America formed in Santa Ana.

Five years later, he assimilated KPCC as a horde of Morning Edition. He was on a atmosphere a morning of a 9/11 attacks in New York and pennyless a grave news to Southern California listeners.

Steve Julian in KPCC's studios in Feb 2001.

Steve Julian in KPCC’s studios in Feb 2001. Bill Youngblood/KPCC

When NPR was delayed to mangle divided from a taped programming to go live, Julian took matters into his possess hands, insisting that KPCC switch over to coverage from New York’s WNYC, according to Davis.

“That preference unequivocally accelerated a change in a perspective of ourselves of an institution,” Davis said.

Julian always sounded ease and collected to listeners even if behind a scenes, his producers were scrambling to cover maturation news. 

“You could get in his ear during a five-second sound byte and contend dual or 3 difference about something that had only broken, and a approach he delivered it, it sounded like communication on a air,” pronounced Nick Stoffel, KPCC’s Morning Edition producer.

A bustling second act in theater

Hosting a repository meant Julian had to be during work by 4 a.m. He spent his giveaway time in a early afternoons and evenings posterior playwriting, directing and behaving in internal theaters.

He destined classics such as “A Streetcar Named Desire” and “Death of Salesman” during the Covina Center for a Performing Arts as good as new plays during L.A.’s Coeurage Theatre Company, a “pay what we want” museum where Julian served on a house of directors.

“I never knew that all this work could come out of one chairman and that he could wear so many opposite hats,” said Eric Czuleger, a playwright who frequently collaborated with Julian.

When Steve Julian of KPCC was diagnosed with a depot mind cancer, his mom Felicia Friesema incited to amicable media for solace, support, and a space to routine this heart-breaking journey.

When Steve Julian of KPCC was diagnosed with a depot mind cancer, his mom Felicia Friesema incited to amicable media for solace, support, and a space to routine this heart-breaking journey. Rachel Myrow/KQED

Julian is survived by his mother, Marlene Julian, and his mom of dual years, Felicia Friesema, a executive of selling and communications during Foothill Transit. She chronicled her husband’s final months in relocating fact online. 

“Steve being Steve, he has supposed many of it with piety and grace,” Friesema wrote in one of her final posts. “But there are times when there is a finish recognition of all he has mislaid in such a brief time.”

Julian was diagnosed with cancer in Nov and has been off a atmosphere given then. In January, KPCC renamed a studio where he hosted Morning Edition “The Steve Julian Studio.”

From Steve’s wife, Felicia: Donations can be done to Coeurage Theatre Company where Steve served as a house member or Ensemble Studio Theater Los Angeles where Steve was an active member.  And of course, donations can be done to KPCC, since he believed so strongly in his employer that he was also a longtime contributing member. 

You can hear a few clips from Steve’s time during KPCC below.